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A Programming Approach towards Addressing Pediatric Drownings
Tiffaney Isaacson1, Yezan "iPod" Hassan1, Bianca Cardiel1, Angelica Baker1, Jodi Brigola2, Catherine Tretiakova1, Jessica Wani3, Brittany Baarson2, Roy Jedeikin2, Diana Bowman3
1Phoenix Children's Hospital, Phoenix, AZ; 2Phoenix Children's Care Network, Phoenix, AZ; 3Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ

Background (issue):
Drowning is endemic to the United States pediatric population, representing the leading cause of unintentional injury death for children aged one to four years generating medical costs of $17.5 million in 2020 (NCIPC, WISQARS cost of injury). In Arizona the drowning rate is nearly double the national rate (5.08 vs 2.72 per 100,000) (NCIPC, Fatal Injury Data, 2021). This study evaluates a Pediatric Drowning Prevention (PDP) pilot program on its ability to provide the tools/strategies pediatric primary care providers (PCPs) need to offer anticipatory guidance to caregivers of children aged one to four years.
Methods:
Program evaluation was accomplished by administering surveys to participating Arizona pediatric PCPs who conduct well-child visits for children aged one to four years. Responses were analyzed using appropriate statistical tests. Findings:
Seven pediatric practices (n=32 providers) participated in the program. Results showed a significant increase between pre- and post-surveys in willingness to share drowning prevention education and discuss the connection between developmental milestones and drowning risk (P<0.001). Furthermore, pediatric provider messaging became more specific and frequent (Figure 1). A larger proportion of participants discussed 'designating a supervising adult during swim time', several months after education. Additionally, participants advised caregivers against taking children to the pool when they are stressed/tired and to ensure that children wear a U.S. Coast Guard approved life jacket. Participants unanimously responded that the PDP program increased caregiver knowledge on drownings, risks, and safety strategies, and recommended this program to other primary care offices. Conclusions (implications for practice):
The results of this pilot are promising. The program positively influenced frequency and messaging of pediatric providers. The PDP program should be replicated and continue to enroll participants.


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