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Outcomes of Operative Treatment for Pediatric Jones Fractures

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Outcomes of Operative Treatment for Pediatric Jones Fractures
Wendy Ramalingam, MD, Katherine Sage, DO, MS, Jaime R. Denning, MD and Charles T Mehlman, DO, MPH, Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center, Cincinnati OH

Objective: Objective The objective of this retrospective case series was to assess radiographic and functional outcomes in pediatric patients who underwent operative intervention for Jones fractures. Methods Characteristics of the patient population, injury type, length of time to radiographic healing and to return to activity after operative fixation were evaluated. Patients were contacted at least one year after surgery to complete the Foot Function Index (FFI), a validated outcomes questionnaire that assesses pain, stiffness, activity limitation, difficulty, and social effects of foot pathology. The FFI score is reported as a ratio out of 100, with higher scores indicating greater dysfunction. Results Fourteen patients (12 male, 2 female) with 17 surgically treated Jones fractures were identified. The time to return to activity averaged 4.63.8 months (range: 1.3-11.5 months). Ten patients completed the FFI (71%) at least a year after surgery. The average FFI score was 225 (range: 17-28), indicating little to no dysfunction. No patients reported activity limitations. 6/10 patients denied dysfunction in any category. 4/10 patients reported mild to moderate pain and stiffness. One patient with osteogenesis imperfecta and multiple subsequent ipsilateral foot fractures reported significant problems finding footwear. Conclusion Surgical treatment of Jones fractures in the pediatric population leads to radiographic healing and return to sport at an average of 5 months and no activity limitations after a minimum of one year.
Objective: Explain.Objective Content: At the end of this activity, the learner will be able to explain that operative treatment of Jones fractures in the pediatric population is an effective treatment for both acute and chronic injuries.


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