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For the Love of Children - Data Driven Initiatives to Improve Pediatric Emergency/Trauma Care

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For the Love of Children - Data Driven Initiatives to Improve Pediatric Emergency/Trauma Care
Diana Fendya, MSN(R), RN1, Elizabeth Edgerton, MD, MPH2 and Anthony Gilchrest, MPA, EMT-P EMS3, 1Trauma Acute Care Specialist, Emergency Medical Services for Children National Resource Center Children's National Health System, Washington DC, 2Director, Division of Child Adolescent and Family Health, MCHB, HRSA, Washington DC, 3Program Manager Emergency Medical Services for Children, National Resource Center Children's National Health System, Washington DC

Objective: Resources for Optimal Care of the Injured Patient 2014, the new Orange Book, clearly delineates obligatory requirements for trauma centers including pediatric trauma centers. Initial resuscitation for many injured children though does not always begin at pediatric trauma centers. The 2009 “Guidelines for Care of Children in the Emergency Department (ED)” similarly defines essential components for emergency care of pediatric patients. Effective initial trauma resuscitation can only occur if a sound foundation for pediatric care exists in every emergency department. Pediatric Trauma Society members were introduced to the National Pediatric Readiness project in 2014. The national assessment of emergency departments had over 4000 or 83% of American hospitals participating in the assessment. The assessment measured the pediatric care capabilities of hospitals, both trauma and non-trauma facilities and identified gaps for improvement. Although progress had been made from an earlier 2002 assessment, the average score for hospitals responding to the 2013 assessment was 69%. The assessment identified numerous opportunities for improvement. The National Pediatric Readiness project is now moving forward into Phase II as a true quality improvement initiative striving to ensure an appropriate foundation exists in every emergency department to provide emergency and trauma care for children. This session will introduce participants to evolving projects addressing identified gaps in pediatric emergency and trauma care while relating the significance of this work to injury and trauma care. Highlighted projects will include: • Pediatric quality improvement • Pediatric safety • Essential Pediatric Domains and Consideration for Disaster Preparedness Policies.
Objective: Describe the significance of pediatric ready emergency/trauma departments and new resources to facilitate readiness to enhance the emergency trauma care of children.Objective Content: I. Recent data illustrates emergency departments are not prepared to provide optimal care for children. A. Optimal Trauma care may not be feasible if emergency departments do not have a basic foundation for providing emergency care. B. Pediatric readiness assessment data has served as the impetus for new tools/resources and collaboratives working together to improve the pediatric readiness of all of America's ED. II. New Resources, new collaboratives A. Partners and Stakeholders - old and new B. Partner projects C. Provider education - QI, PET D. Tools - pediatric readiness toolkit, quality improvement on line module, disaster planning, and transfer toolkit.


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