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Pediatric Trauma Society
PTS MEET
In an effort to continue to live and promote the PTS mission of improving outcomes for injured children through development of optimal care guidelines, education, research and advocacy the PTS brought to you a webinar series, PTS MEET (Monthly Education Experience on Trauma) from January – July 2021. Below is a listing of the PTS MEET Webinars that were hosted. To view the recorded webinars and webinar materials, please click the more information button below.

February

Preparing For A Virtual Site Visit - Thursday, February 4, 2021

  1. Understand knowledge about the ACS view point and philosophy about virtual visits in the future
  2. Understand better the process in which to prepare for an ACS virtual Site Visit
  3. Obtain valuable information that will increase knowledge about how to host an ACS virtual Site visit during the visit

Session Description:
Join PTS as we navigate you through a virtual site visit through the eyes of an ACS reviewer, a trauma program manager and trauma program director. The esteemed faculty will let you in on knowledge on what a reviewer is looking for, how to prepare for the site visit, and how to present the material on the day of the visit. This session will begin with an overview from Dr. Maxson on a brief background on the virtual site visits from an ACS point of view, we will then lead into a panel discussion among the faculty on each step of the site visit including PRQ, chart selection, getting chart information to reviewers, and chart review. Following the panel discussion there will be ample opportunity for you to ask questions to the panel.

Moderator:
Lisa Nichols, MBA, BSN, RN, CCRN-K Lisa Nichols, MBA, BSN, RN, CCRN-K
Wolfson Children's Hospital, Jacksonville, FL

Panelists:
R. Todd Maxson R. Todd Maxson
Arkansas Children's Hospital,
Little Rock, AR
Maria F. McMahon, MSN, RN, PNP-PC/AC, TCRN Maria F. McMahon, MSN, RN,
PNP-PC/AC, TCRN
Boston Children's Hospital,
Boston, MA

View Presentation
David P. Mooney, MD, MPH David P. Mooney, MD, MPH
Boston Children's Hospital,
Boston, MA

View Presentation



Can We Prevent the Kid "Quake" – Identifying and Optimizing Injury Prevention Efforts Targeting Pediatric Falls

Objectives:

Session Description
Falls in the adult population have become a significant safety concern as many lead to significant morbidity, prolonged length of stay, and all too often death. However, the impact around pediatric falls is more difficult to characterize. Children are explorers by nature and their boundless curiosity directly correlates with unexpected tumbles, ejections, and falls. Falls from recreational activities such as horseback riding, family trips to the market, or sporting events are commonly seen in pediatric emergency rooms. Over 200,000 children are seen annually in emergency departments following playground related injuries and falls. In more severe cases, children may fall from second story bedroom windows or off ladders and elevated platforms. In many pediatric centers, falls comprise the largest share of injures seen in our emergency rooms and eventually entered in our trauma registries. Pediatric injury prevention teams are tasked with a challenge to decrease the occurrence and morbidity for events that are by nature difficult to predict and multi-faceted.

Moderator:
Dan Little, MD Session Introduction
Dan Little, MD
McLane Children’s Hospital, Temple, TX

Kids will do the DARNDEST things... And then they fall
Christine Frugard, MSN, RN, PNP-AC Falls in the Suburbs
Christine Frugard, MSN, RN, PNP-AC
K. Hovnanian Children’s Hospital at Jersey Shore University Medical Center, Neptune City, NJ
Judith Egly, MSN, RN-BC, CSN Falls on the Farm
Judith Egly, MSN, RN-BC, CSN
Janet Weis Children’s Hospital, Danville, PA
Sharon Evans, RN, BSN, CPN, CPSTI, Falls in the Arena
Sharon Evans, RN, BSN, CPN, CPSTI,
Cook Children’s Hospital, Fort Worth, TX
Dan Little, MD Falls in the Grocery
Dan Little, MD
McLane Children’s Hospital, Temple, TX
Cindy Colson, MSN, RN, CCRN, TCRN, NRP Strengthening Your Injury Prevention Approach through Accurate Registry Inclusion and Heat-Mapping
Cindy Colson, MSN, RN, CCRN, TCRN, NRP
Children’s National Medical Center, Washington D.C.
Carrie Rhodes, CPST-I Exploring Novel Approaches To Home Safety through “Make Safe Happen”
Carrie Rhodes, CPST-I
Nationwide Children’s Hospital, Columbus, OH
Question and Answer with the Entire Panel



March

Checking the Trauma Research Box and Beyond

Objectives:

Session Description:
This session is designed to address the needs of both trauma program managers and physicians interested in increasing research productivity and impact with limited time and resources. The session will discuss strategies to maximize the use of existing data sources, such as trauma registries, to produce multiple research products. It will also describe strategies to collect more robust data for performance improvement activities that can be used for future research projects, designing local prospective research studies, and informing the development of new interventions and guidelines. Finally, the session will discuss what issues trauma program managers and physicians need to consider before they begin to collect data for a performance improvement project.

Moderator:
Ankush Gosain, MD, PhD Ankush Gosain, MD, PhD
Lebonheur Children's Hospital Level I Trauma Center, Memphis, TN
Ankush Gosain, MD, PhD Introduction
Ankush Gosain, MD, PhD
Lebonheur Children's Hospital Level I Trauma Center, Memphis, TN
Gina Berg, PhD Leveraging Your In-House Resources: Registrars, Research, and Other Staff
Gina Berg, PhD
Wesley Medical Center Univ of Kansas School of Medicine, Wichita, KS
Teresa Bell, PhD How to Maximize Trauma Quality Improvement Data for Research Purposes
Teresa Bell, PhD
University of Utah School of Medicine, Salt Lake City, UT
Strategies to Improve the Quality of Data Collected for Performance Improvement Activities Strategies to Improve the Quality of Data
Collected for Performance Improvement Activities

Rita Burke, PhD, MPH
Keck School of Medicine, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA
Question and Answer with the Entire Panel



April

Successfully Publishing your Research: Scientific Paper Writing Do's and Don'ts and How to Target the Right Journal

Objectives
At the end of the session the participants will have increased understanding of:

Session Description:
The PTS publication committee was formed to help PTS presenters publish their work in peer reviewed journals. Although the quantity and quality of research presented at the PTS annual meeting continues to rise, the quality of the manuscripts submitted can significantly improve. Unfortunately, excellent impactful research that is poorly presented may not be published or end up being published in a journal that no one reads.

This session will focus on the art and science of translating research into a manuscript that will have a high likelihood of publication. Each journal has a distinct style and content for their readership, and different expectations with respect to content and importance of the “impact factor”. The session will describe and show examples of how each section of a manuscript should be constructed, and what should and should not be included. We will include a discussion describing common pitfalls and flaws that will doom a manuscript from publication in a quality journal. In addition, we will describe the "impact factor" and discuss its implications with respect to what journals may or may not publish a manuscript. This will be followed by a question and answer period with researchers on the Publications Committee who are invited reviewers for the Journal of Trauma and Acute Care Surgery as well as a proven successful track record with publishing in JTACS.
Peter Ehrlich, MD Welcome and Introduction

What is a Peer Review Journal, What is an Impact Factor and Targeting the Correct Journal?
Peter F. Ehrlich, MD
University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI
Robert W. Letton, Jr., MD It Begins with the Right Question
Robert W. Letton, Jr., MD
Nemours Children's Specialty Care, Jacksonville, FL
Aaron Jensen, MD Common Mistakes in Paper Writing from the Abstract, Introduction to the Discussion
Aaron Jensen, MD
UCSF Benioff Children's Hospital Oakland, Oakland, CA



May

Anesthesiologist's Pitfalls and Pearls for Managing the Difficult Airway in Pediatric Trauma Patients

Objectives:

Session Description: Management of pediatric airways remains a challenge for all those caring for injured child. Difficult airways in pediatric trauma patients can present significant challenges to the pediatric trauma team and result in life-threatening consequences. A difficult airway is described as difficulty with face mask ventilation and/ or laryngoscopy and intubation. Lack of a standardized difficult airway algorithm in pediatrics, difficulty with front of neck procedures in neonates, and general poor apneic reserve in pediatric patients are some of the factors that confer difficulty with minimizing secondary injury from hypoxia, hypercarbia, and hypotension. This webinar will be a case based discussion on pitfalls and pearls in caring for the injured child with a difficult airway. Equipment, adjuvants, and medications to assist with the management of the pediatric difficult airway will be demonstrated to show how they help mitigate the complications of the difficult airway that may propagate secondary injury on our pediatric patients. Furthermore, thoughtful discussion and reflection of the multidisciplinary contributions during the management of a difficult airway in a pediatric trauma patient can enhance success and reduce complications, as well as identify under-utilized resources present at institutions during these experiences.

Moderators: Nicole Dobija, MD & Rebecca Nause-Osthoff, MD

Nicole Dobija, MD
Nicole Dobija, MD
University of Michigan CS Mott Children’s Hospital of Michigan Medicine, Ann Arbor, MI
Known Risk Factors for Pediatric Difficult Airway

Trauma Cases and Airway Equipment

Brief Overview of Anesthetic Drugs in Pediatric Trauma
Rebecca Nause-Osthoff, MD Rebecca Nause-Osthoff, MD
University of Michigan CS Mott Children’s Hospital of Michigan Medicine, Ann Arbor, MI
Peter Ehrlich, MD Benefits of a Multidisciplinary Approach
Peter Ehrlich, MD
University of Michigan CS Mott Children’s Hospital of Michigan Medicine, Ann Arbor, MI
Amy Randall, MSN, RN, TCRN Supporting Performance Improvement
Amy Randall, MSN, RN, TCRN
University of Michigan CS Mott Children’s Hospital of Michigan Medicine, Ann Arbor, MI
Question and Answer with the Entire Panel



June - Screening Tools in Pediatric Trauma

Objectives of Session:

Session Description: CRAFFT, NAT, PTSD…so many screenings. What's required by the ACS? What’s considered best practice? How does a provider find time to administer the screen and what should be done if it’s positive? Our multidisciplinary panel can help guide you and your institution.

Moderators:
Elizabeth Waibel, MSN, CPNP Elizabeth Waibel, MSN, CPNP
Children's National Medical Center, Washington, DC
Brandi Farrell, DNP Brandi Farrell, DNP
UT Health Science Center, San Antonio, TX

Faculty:
Mark B. Slidell, MD, MPH Trauma Medical Director:
Mark B. Slidell, MD, MPH
The University of Chicago, Chicago, IL
View Presentation
Lisa Nichols, MBA, BSN, RN, CCRN-K Trauma Program Manager:
Lisa Nichols, MBA, BSN, RN, CCRN-K
Wolfson Children's Hospital, Jacksonville, FL
View Presentation
Dana L. Noffsinger, RN, MS, AC, MS, ACPNP APP:
Dana L. Noffsinger, RN, MS, AC, MS, ACPNP
Nationwide Children's Hospital, Columbus, OH
View Presentation
Marie Ritzo, LICSW Social Worker:
Marie Ritzo, LICSW
Children's National Medical Center, Washington, DC
View Presentation
Carisa Parrish, PhD Psychologist:
Carisa Parrish, PhD
Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD
View Presentation



July - Traumatic Brain Injury: The Road from First Response to Recovery

Objectives:

Session Description: A single patient case will be utilized to highlight major intervention points in care from the moment of injury to the long term rehabilitation phases. Individual phases of care include EMS/initial trauma response, emergency department care, ICU care, transition to acute care, transition to rehabilitation and outpatient care. We will discuss potential points where outcomes can be optimized and the evidence behind these. Case-specific imaging will be utilized to delineate points of intervention. Family communication will also be covered, both in the acute and chronic phases.

Faculty:
Eric A. Sribnick, MD
Nationwide Children's Hospital, Columbus, OH
Nathan Rosenberg, MD
Nationwide Children's Hospital, Columbus, OH