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Temporal Trends In Pediatric Firearm Injuries Using The National Trauma Data Bank
Elizabeth Alore, Huirong Zhu, Mario Vera, *Bindi Naik-Mathuria
Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX

Background (issue):
To define temporal trends in firearm injury and intent by U.S. region. We hypothesized that prevalence of firearm injuries would be increasing over time. Methods:
The National Trauma Data Bank was queried from 2007-2015 for firearm injuries in children <18 years. Intent and U.S. regions were analyzed. Population was calculated based on census data. Findings:
Of 29,795 pediatric firearm injuries, 10,953 (37%) occurred in the South, 7,244 (24%) in the Midwest, 6,403 (21%) in the West, 3,407 (11%) in the Northeast, and 1,788 (6%) unreported. Males represented 86% of injuries and did not vary by region (p=0.05). Black youth incurred 59% of injuries, followed by white (19%), Hispanic (17%) and Asian/other (5%). 73% occurred in 15-17 year-olds. Assault represented the majority of injuries in 0-4 year-olds (49%), 12-14 year-olds (59%) and 15-17 year-olds (80%); accidental injury represented the majority in 5-11 year-olds (46%;p<0.001). The Northeast had lowest rates of assault (24.9 per 1,000,000), suicide (1.1/1,000,000), and accidental (3.7/1,000,000) injuries. The South had highest rates of suicide (2.7/1,000,000;p<0.001) and accidental (9.8/1,000,000;p<0.001) injuries. The Midwest had highest assault rate (36.5/1,000,000;p<0.001). There is a significant trend in increasing suicide (p=0.01) and accidental (p=0.02) injuries over time (Figure 1). Conclusions (implications for practice):
The majority of pediatric firearm injuries are due to assaults among teenagers. Despite increased national attention on firearm injury prevention, rates of accidental injuries and suicides are increasing.


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