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Parental Distress as Predictor of Quality of Life Impairments in Pediatric Burn Patients Over Time
Kaushalendra Amatya, PhD, Margo Szabo, MA, Dylan Stewart, MD, Susan Ziegfeld, PNP-BC, Rick Ostrander, Ed.D., Carisa Perry-Parrish PhD. Johns Hopkins Hospital, Baltimore, MD, USA.

Although quality of life (QOL) and psychological functioning have been well studied in pediatric burn populations (e.g., Daltroy et al., 2000), limited research has examined predictors of children's QOL following a burn. Parent symptomatic distress is a factor that may predict children's QOL, given that parents of pediatric burn survivors in early childhood experience clinically significant acute stress reactions (Bakker et al., 2012). The current study investigated the role of parent symptomatic distress as a risk factor for QOL over time in pediatric burn patients. Participants were pediatric burn patients (N = 41; 52.9% female; 4.0-14.1 years; M = 9.3 years) and their families who were screened in at least two outpatient clinic visits by a pediatric psychologist using the Child's Dermatology Life Quality Index (CDLQI; Lewis-Jones & Finlay, 1995) and Short Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder Rating (SPRINT; Connor & Davidson, 2001). Results indicate that children's QOL impairment at time 1 and time 2 are both positively correlated with parent stress at time 1. Regression analyses showed that parent stress at time 1 explained 45.0% of variance in children's QOL impairment at time 1 and 24.5% of variance at time 2, while parent stress at time 2 explained 21.0% of variance at time 1. These findings highlight the importance of parent symptomatic distress in predicting QOL difficulties among pediatric burn patients, both concurrently and longitudinally. Prevention and intervention efforts amongst pediatric burn patients should emphasize strengthening parental adjustment and coping to target adaptive outcomes in children.


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