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Safe-Seat: An Education Program on Child Passenger Safety for Pediatric Trainees
Anita Mantha, MD1, Kristen Beckworth, MPH, CHES2, John Ansiaux2, Carol Chen, MD3, Benjamin Hoffman, MD4, Rohit Shenoi MD3. 1Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX, USA, 2Texas Children's Hospital, Houston, TX, USA, 3Baylor College of Medicine: Pediatric Emergency Medicine, Houston, TX, USA, 4Oregon Health and Science University, Portland, OR, USA.

Motor vehicle crashes are a leading cause of death in US children. The CDC recommends using age- and size-appropriate child safety seats (CSS) to reduce injuries. 43% of physicians report having received no training in child passenger safety (CPS) and only 37% know where to refer caregivers for more information. The study design consisted of a prospective, randomized study with cross-over design comparing two types of education methods in child passenger safety. The study participants consisted of 48 Baylor pediatric residents, at varying levels of medical training, with a median age of 28 years. The participant's baseline knowledge was assessed via a validated questionnaire. The two methods were: 1) Hands-on education performed by certified CPS technician 2) Online education with a 60 minute American Academy of Pediatrics module After 6 months the study groups were swapped and participants received the opposite educational method (See Fig .1). Both hands-on groups were assessed by a certified CPS tech and given a score for both rear and forward facing education. The preliminary data shows a statistically significant improvement in mean pre-post test knowledge and long-term knowledge scores for both groups. The hands-on group showed improvement in CSS installation scores for both rear and forward facing, while this same trend was not reflected in the online education group. Hands-on education is effective in sustaining long-term retention of complex CPS education. Pediatric residents trained with added CPS education are essential to producing more knowledgeable clinicians when informing parents about this critically important topic.


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