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A Multidisciplinary Child Protective Team Improves the Care of Non-Accidental Trauma Patients
John M. Draus, Jr., MD and M. Carol Wright, RN, Kentucky Children's Hospital, Lexington KY

Abstract:
Introduction: In February 2014, we formalized a multidisciplinary Child Protection Team (CPT) as a subgroup of our pediatric multidisciplinary trauma peer review committee. Meetings are held monthly. Non-accidental trauma (NAT) patients from the preceding month are reviewed. The meeting has two parts. During the open part, child protective services (CPS) workers are invited to discuss specific cases. The closed part focuses on the improvement of specific processes and future outcomes. Attendance is recorded, and minutes are kept. We sought to review the accomplishments of this group. Methods: We retrospectively reviewed the minutes from our CPT meetings. We tracked attendance, cases reviewed, process improvement projects, and corrective action plans. Results: Meeting attendance was very good � 78%. During this time, we had 141 suspected NAT patients; 96 were reviewed at our meeting. CPS workers attended 53% of the meetings; 13 investigations were discussed. We established a clinical practice guideline for the evaluation of NAT patients. We created a mechanism to improve compliance with follow-up skeletal surveys. Six corrective letters were sent to individuals notifying them of care concerns and opportunities for improvement. Equipment needs were identified, and we obtained a digital camera and speaker phone. We recently conducted a half-day educational session at an outside hospital. Conclusions: Our CPT meeting has improved the care of our NAT patients. It has provided better communication between our hospital and CPS workers. We have improved in-hospital processes for our NAT patients. We have provided educational opportunities to outside care providers.
Objective:
Discuss the advantages of a multidisciplinary peer review committee to improve the care of non-accidental trauma patients in a children's hospital.
Objective Content: A multidisciplinary peer review committee focused on non-accidental trauma victims improves communication between hospital personnel and CPS workers. It helps standardize the evaluation of these children. It can provide educational opportunities to outside care providers.


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