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Injury Prevention Journal Scan

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CITATION: Safe States Alliance and National Associations of County and City Health Officials (NACCHO) (2017). Standards and Indicators for Model Level I and II Trauma Center Injury and Violence Prevention Programs. Available from: https://www.safestates.org/page/traumaivp.

TOPIC: Injury Prevention

REVIEW: (D Daniels)

TITLE: Standards and Indicators for Model Level I and II Trauma Center Injury and Violence Prevention Programs

AUTHORS: Nicole Lezin and Carol McPhillips-Tangum for the Safe States Alliance and National Association of County and City Health Officials.

WHY THIS ARTICLE IS RELEVANT OR IMPORTANT: Injuries remain the leading cause of death among children over the age of one year of age. Pediatric Trauma Centers, as part of their mission, are mandated by the American College of Surgeons to implement injury prevention programs in order to decrease the burden of injury in their communities. However, there is minimal guidance available to assist trauma centers in designing hospital based injury prevention programs. This document provides a core set of standards and indicators that can assist the trauma center to design effective injury prevention programs. These standards and indicators allow each trauma center to evaluate their injury and violence prevention programs to determine strengths as well as areas for improvement. These standards, used in conjunction with the Core Competencies for Injury and Violence Prevention professionals (https://www.safestates.org/page/CoreCompetencies#Core Competencies for Injury and Violence Prevention), will assist the Injury Violence Prevention Specialist and the Trauma Center in providing strong injury and violence prevention programs.

VERY BRIEF REVIEW: The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention funded Safe States Alliance and the National Association of County and City Health Official to develop national standards and indicators for trauma center injury and violence prevention programs. The five key components of a Model Level I and Level II Trauma Center Injury and Violence Prevention Programs are: Leadership; Resources; Data; Effective Interventions; and Partnerships. For each key component, the model standard has been defined as well as key indicators that would indicate that the standard is being met for both smaller/newer programs as well as more mature programs.

CITATION: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Administration for Children and Families, Administration on Children, Youth and Families, Children’s Bureau. (2019). Child Maltreatment 2017. Available from https://www.acf.hhs.gov/cb/research-data-technology/statistics-research/child-maltreatment.

TOPIC: Injury Prevention; Child Abuse

REVIEW: (D Daniels)

TITLE: Child Maltreatment 2017

AUTHORS: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Administration for Children and Families, Administration on Children, Youth and Families, Children's Bureau.

WHY THIS ARTICLE IS RELEVANT OR IMPORTANT: Child abuse remains a significant issue for many pediatric trauma centers. States vary greatly in their policies and data collection methodologies when defining child abuse. In order to provide effective services to high-risk families, an understanding of child abuse data, both nationally and at the state level, is essential when developing programs and interventions. This report provides both the national statistics as well as a comparison of child maltreatment statistics for each state. Used in conjunction with local data, hospital injury prevention programs can use the data to partner with local agencies in their communities to provide interventions for high risk families.

VERY BRIEF REVIEW: During the Federal Fiscal Year 2017 (FFY 2017), there were an estimated 674,000 victims of child abuse and neglect - a rate of 9.1 victims per 1,000 children in the population. Of these children, 18.3% suffer physical abuse. Children in their first year of life have the highest rate of victimization at a rate of 25.3 per 1,000 children of the same age. It is estimated that 1720 children died in FFY 2017 with 71.8% of children less than three years of age.

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